I have been extremely lucky in film sound.  I began my career working under two of the best mentors anyone could dream of:  Walter Murch and Ben Burtt.  The main lesson among thousands I learned from them is that film works best when it is truly and deeply collaborative.  In this blog I will express my thoughts about film sound design, sound editing, music, and mixing.

6 thoughts

  1. Hi Randy,

    After reading your first three blog posts I have to say that is a fantastically honest blog on film sound design. I am currently a student in my final year in England and your blog post ‘The Landscape Sound Lives In’ is something incredibly relevant to me right now as some of my fellow course mates and I have been insisting on our involvement in the process of script suggestions and we have been seeing first hand the benefits to the film when that inclusion is taking on board by the director.

    I find the concept of Cacayanga really interesting and hope to incorporate it into my own work and as for The Revenant, what grasped me was the variance in the atmospherics.

    Looking forward to reading more of your blogs posts!
    Thanks, Rory Hunter

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  2. I am teaching a class on sound and music in film this semester. I have requested that my students follow this blog. Next time I teach this class, it will be a requirement. You have always been one of our most articulate representatives in film sound.

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  3. Similar to Vanessa Ament’s comment, I am teaching a class on the importance of Sound in Films. Your work on film sound speaks volumes by itself, but in addition to this you continue to contribute with great articles in filmsound,org, designingsound.org and now with your blog. This will be required reading for the students. Designing a Movie For Sound is already part of their learning both from an audio and visual perspective. Thank you, Martin.

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  4. Everything must be balanced.

    Our passion for art and creative work has no limit and can sometime consume us more than what we hoped for. It’s nothing new. Many of us struggle everyday to set proper boundaries between work and family, even Ben Burtt went through that. I hear similar stories from everybody working in a creative field and I’m wondering why we all experience the same pattern. I applied for years what I learned from the most successful people, you included. Continuously, I wired my brain to stay alerted for great sounds, brainstormed creative solutions, studied, exercised and experimented around our passion when I wasn’t at work and repeatedly failed at giving full attention to my loved ones. I certainly didn’t give enough time to my other self as well.

    I built habits that became strongly wired in my brain and it now seems difficult to un-wire them to re-balance family over work. I found good tips online and read many books that temporarily helped, but strong habits act on the unconscious and always seem to come back without your notice. I know that brain plasticity and the power of habits can change our lives, I need to continue practice and re-wire my brain cells but the feeling of getting puled with ropes from both arms also continues everyday.

    My work place is absolutely fantastic and supportive and doesn’t encourage crunch.
    My family has put up with a lot over the year and understands it’s not easy.
    I believe I have both the problem and the solution and just need to find a better balance.
    I admire and respect the work you and your team have accomplished.
    I really enjoy your blog but I wish you talked about this subject and shared your experience.

    Thank you Randy!

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    1. Thanks, Jed!
      I’ve been divorced twice, and the stresses of work were among the most important reasons for those divorces. I wish I could describe a path that would balance work and personal life equ

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