Ultra Close-Ups and Ultra Wide Shots

The medium shot is often the least interesting way to look at something, because it more or less duplicates the point of view we most often have in every day life. It usually has very little mystery, and mystery is what draws us into the story.

Extreme close-ups and extreme wide shots hang visual question marks in the air that the brain calls on the ears to help answer.

Great Example: Carroll Ballard’s The Black Stallion is a master class on image and sound feeding each other. The boy freeing the horse on the beach is as good as cinema gets, and as brilliant as the sound work is, the camera work makes it possible.

2 thoughts

  1. I’m also thinking about the close ups on the horse and the wide shots of Montana’s landscapes in “The Horse Whisperer”

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